Claypoole Films

Claypoole Films, a wedding and corporate film production studio based in Pennsylvania, celebrates a brand new identity with a new moniker, logo, and website designed to highlight the craft of preserving those beautiful memories.

2017

A case in identity.

When I was first approached to work on the Claypoole Films site, the studio was undergoing a transition to a brand new name and identity. P. Edward Claypoole originally operated as Memideo Productions, a portmanteau of memory and video. His former logo relied on flashy graphics and skeuomorphic effects, trends which were once popular in the design industry but rapidly aging in a time of flat and clean design.

When transitioning to Claypoole Films, it was immediately clear that the new identity should take on a more classic, professional style that was more suited for Claypoole’s target demographics.

A website designed to reflect a beautiful craft.

Claypoole sought a new website that was modern, professional, and appropriate for the style of film he was producing. We determined early on that a one-page website would be ideal for the studio, but with careful attention applied to each section that made each section distinct and captivating. Beautiful high-resolution photographs take the background of Claypoole’s two main sections, with just the right amount of information to convey what Claypoole is capable of. There’s no superfluous information, just the essentials.

We paid careful attention to the typography for the site. The type is set in Semplicita Pro by Canada Type, a digitization of Alessandro Butti’s original 1928 work for the Nebiolo Type Foundry. We wanted a typeface that paired well with Claypoole Film’s logo, but also one that reflected the character and significance of the works the studio produces. The face provides the balance between the elegance and expressiveness of the Italian Renaissance, with the modernism and cleanliness of a sans-serif. It creates a harmony that is pleasing to read while adding a sense of class and timelessness that weddings call for.